Written by: Tim Edison

Updated: June 4, 2023

17 White Wine Grapes Explained [Varieties & Characteristics]

White wine is a popular and versatile drink that comes in many different styles and varieties.

One of the factors that contributes to the diversity of white wines is the range of grape varieties that are used to make them.

They are used to produce a wide range of white wines, from light and crisp to full-bodied and complex. Additionally, they are also used in the production of sparkling wines, such as Champagne and Prosecco.

Some grape varieties are well-known and widely cultivated around the world, while others are more obscure and only grown in certain regions.

Let's take a look at the popular white wine grape varietals and what makes them special.


Types of White Wine Grapes

In this section, we will explore some of the most popular types of white wine grapes, including their origins, flavor profile, and food pairings.


1. Chardonnay

Chardonnay is one of the most popular and wide-ranging white wine grapes in the world. Originating in the Burgundy region of France, the variety has found a home in nearly every wine producing region around the globe, from the chalky soils of Champagne to the sun-soaked valleys of California, and even the cooler climates of New Zealand and Tasmania.

The chameleon-like nature of the Chardonnay grape is what truly sets it apart. Its flavor profile and structure can change dramatically depending on the climate, soil, and winemaking techniques employed. 

In cooler climates, such as Chablis in France or the Yarra Valley in Australia, Chardonnay wines tend to exhibit crisp acidity, lean structure, and flavors of green apple, pear, and citrus.

As the climate warms, the flavors become richer and more tropical, with notes of peach, melon, and pineapple emerging, as seen in Californian or Chilean Chardonnays.

The use of oak and malolactic fermentation, a process that softens the naturally high acidity and adds a creamy, buttery dimension, can add further layers of complexity.

These techniques can infuse the wine with a rich, creamy mouthfeel, and flavors of vanilla, baked bread, and toasty notes. Today, many winemakers strive for balance, using these methods sparingly to enhance rather than overpower the natural fruit character of the wine.

Chardonnay is also a key component in many sparkling wines, including Champagne. Its high acidity and neutral flavor profile make it an ideal canvas for the effects of secondary fermentation in the bottle, adding bready, toasty flavors and a creamy mousse.

Food pairing with Chardonnay depends on the style of the wine. Leaner, unoaked versions pair well with light seafood dishes, raw oysters, and goat cheese, while richer, oaked Chardonnays can stand up to roasted chicken, creamy pasta dishes, and a variety of cheeses, including Brie and Gruyere.

The versatility and broad appeal of Chardonnay have secured its place as a staple in the wine world. From humble table wines to prestigious Grand Cru Burgundies and elegant sparklers, the Chardonnay grape truly offers something for everyone.


2. Sauvignon Blanc

Hailing from the Bordeaux region of France, the Sauvignon Blanc grape is a green-skinned marvel that has gained international acclaim for its role in the crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wines.

Its versatility and distinctive flavor profile have paved the way for its successful growth in various regions across the globe.

Upon first glance, the Sauvignon Blanc grapes stand out with their vibrant green hue, exuding a lively and youthful persona. The grapes are typically small to medium-sized and are often harvested in the cooler hours of morning to retain their zesty acidity.

Sauvignon Blanc, when vinified, is renowned for its crisp, vibrant character and its unmistakable aroma profile. It entices the senses with a bouquet of fresh herbs intertwined with notes of green apple, lime, and gooseberry.

In some regions, you might even detect a unique 'cat pee' aroma, a description that may sound off-putting but is, in fact, an endearing trait among Sauvignon Blanc enthusiasts.

When it comes to its flavor profile, Sauvignon Blanc offers a high-acid, tangy experience that invigorates the palate. The flavors often mirror the nose, showcasing notes of citrus, green apple, and tropical fruit in warmer regions, accompanied by an underlying mineral streak.

Sauvignon Blanc has proven to be a cosmopolitan grape, thriving in a range of regions. While its roots lie in France's Bordeaux and Loire Valley regions, it has also found a home in New Zealand, where it has become a national emblem of sorts. Other notable regions include South Africa, Chile, California, and Australia.

In terms of winemaking techniques, many winemakers choose to ferment and age Sauvignon Blanc in stainless steel tanks to maintain its fresh, fruit-forward character.

However, in regions like Bordeaux, it's not uncommon to see the wine fermented or aged in oak, which imparts a richer, creamier texture and adds an extra layer of complexity.

Food pairing with Sauvignon Blanc is a delightful journey, thanks to its high acidity and pronounced flavors. It pairs wonderfully with goat cheese, a classic combination in the Loire Valley.

Its herbaceous character makes it a natural partner to fresh salads, green vegetables, and dishes with herbs. Light fish or chicken dishes work well, as do a variety of seafood, including oysters and sushi.


3. Riesling

Riesling is a white grape variety that is used to produce some of the world's most renowned and age-worthy wines.

The grapes are small to medium in size with a round to oval shape, and the skin is thin, translucent, and can range in color from yellow-green to nearly pink or purple, depending on the climate and ripening conditions.

The hallmark of Riesling is its incredible aromatic character. These grapes exude a wide range of scents that translate directly into the wine's aroma.

In warmer climates, you may find hints of fresh apple, pear, peach, and tropical fruits, whereas in cooler climates, the aroma might lean towards lime, Meyer lemon, and a distinct minerality.

Fascinatingly, Riesling wines often take on the characteristics of the soil in which the grapes are grown. Therefore, you might detect unique terroir-driven notes such as petrol, honeycomb, or wet stone.

On the palate, Riesling wines are renowned for their high acidity. This trait can perfectly balance out the sweetness in wines made from very ripe grapes. The flavor profile often mirrors the aroma, with fruit flavors ranging from tart citrus in cool climates to lush stone fruit and tropical notes in warmer areas.

While Riesling is grown in many wine-producing regions worldwide, it is most closely associated with Germany, where it originated. The steep river valleys of the Mosel are particularly noted for their high-quality Riesling wines. The variety is also successfully grown in Alsace in France, the Finger Lakes in New York, and parts of Australia and New Zealand.

Riesling wines can be made in a range of styles, from bone dry to lusciously sweet. Notably, the grape's high acidity and balance of flavors make it an excellent candidate for late-harvest dessert wines, including the renowned German Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein.

In terms of food pairings, Riesling is incredibly versatile due to its balance of sweetness and acidity. It pairs well with a wide range of foods, from spicy Asian cuisine to rich, creamy cheeses.


4. Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris

Pinot Grigio, or Pinot Gris as it is known in France, is a white wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. Originating in France, these grapes are now grown in many wine-producing regions around the world, including Italy, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand.

The Pinot Grigio grape is known for its grayish-blue fruits, which is where the 'Gris' or 'Grigio' (meaning gray in French and Italian respectively) comes from. The grapes can also have a pinkish hue, and it's the color of these grapes that sets them apart and hints at the variety of flavors they can express.

Pinot Grigio is typically known for light, crisp wines, especially those from Italy. These wines often have flavors of green apple, pear, and citrus, with a refreshing, zesty acidity. They can also have a striking mineral note, reminiscent of wet stone or steel, particularly when grown in vineyards with high mineral content in the soil.

French Pinot Gris, particularly from the Alsace region, tends to be fuller-bodied, richer, and more aromatic. These wines can have notes of ripe tropical fruits, honey, and even a hint of spice. They're often more complex and have a rounder mouthfeel compared to their Italian counterparts.

Winemaking techniques can have a significant impact on the flavor profile of Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris wines. Some winemakers choose to age their wines in oak barrels to add complexity and a smoother, buttery texture. Others prefer to keep the wine in stainless steel tanks to preserve its fresh, fruit-forward character.

Food pairings for Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris are quite diverse due to its range in style. Lighter styles pair well with light dishes such as seafood, salads, and light pastas. The richer, more full-bodied styles can stand up to heartier fare like roasted poultry, pork, and cream-based sauces.


5. Gewürztraminer

Ah, Gewürztraminer, a white grape that's not just a tongue twister but a real sensory delight.

It hails originally from the wine-growing region of Tramin in South Tyrol, which is now part of modern-day Italy. The prefix 'Gewürz' was later added, a nod to the German word for spice, and indeed this grape variety promises a heady bouquet of aromas and flavours.

If one were to describe Gewürztraminer in human terms, it's certainly the extrovert of the wine world. The grape's skins are pink to red, which lend the wines a deep, golden color, often more intense than many other whites.

A sniff of Gewürztraminer is a journey into a florist's shop - rose petals and lychees seem to leap from the glass, with undertones of ginger spice, and sometimes even a hint of smoke or incense.

On the palate, Gewürztraminer refuses to be ignored. It can deliver powerful flavours of tropical fruit - think lychees again, but also mango, passionfruit - all layered with that signature spiciness.

It's typically full-bodied, with a viscous, almost oily texture, and lower acidity than many white wines. This can make it taste sweeter than it technically is, although both dry and sweet styles of Gewürztraminer are produced.

Gewürztraminer has found homes in several corners of the globe. Alsace in France is perhaps its most famous haunt, where it produces highly aromatic, dry wines that can age for many years.

The grape has also travelled to Germany, Austria, the New World regions like New Zealand, Australia and the United States, where varying terroirs and winemaking techniques have teased out different facets of this chameleonic variety.

Pairing Gewürztraminer with food can be fun. Its bold flavours stand up to spicy Asian cuisine, like Thai or Indian food, quite brilliantly. The sweetness of a fully ripe Gewürztraminer can also balance dishes with a sweet and sour element, and it's one of the few wines that can handle the heat of chilli.

In the hands of the right winemaker, Gewürztraminer is a white that can challenge even the most experienced of palates, its myriad of flavours always seem to have something new to say. If you're a wine lover who leans towards the bold and the beautiful, this is a variety that's well worth exploring.


6. Chenin Blanc

Chenin Blanc is a white wine grape that's a bit like an actor skilled in a range of roles - versatile, adaptable, and capable of expressing a variety of tones and moods.

The grape originates from the Loire Valley in France, where it still produces some of its most renowned expressions, but it's also found fame and acclaim thousands of miles away in South Africa.

One of the most striking features of Chenin Blanc is its inherent acidity. This characteristic lends it a wonderful freshness and vivacity that can be utterly charming, and also allows it to age gracefully, evolving complex secondary and tertiary flavors over time. The natural acidity makes it an adept player in a range of styles, from bone dry to lusciously sweet, and even sparkling wines.

In its youth, Chenin Blanc boasts an inviting spectrum of flavors, starting with crisp apple and pear, moving through citrus and tropical fruit, and often showcasing floral and mineral nuances. With age, these youthful fruit notes evolve and mingle with flavors of honey, nuts, and often a distinctive wet wool character.

In terms of color, Chenin Blanc wines are typically pale straw in their youth, deepening to a rich gold with age. The wines can be light- to full-bodied, often with a characteristic waxy or lanolin texture that adds depth and complexity.

The heartland of Chenin Blanc, the Loire Valley, showcases the grape's impressive range. Places like Vouvray, Savennières, and Anjou produce sparkling, dry, off-dry, and sweet wines all from Chenin Blanc.

In South Africa, it's the country's most planted grape variety and the source of a range of styles, from everyday quaffers to complex, age-worthy bottlings.

When it comes to food pairings, Chenin Blanc's high acidity and array of flavors makes it a versatile partner at the table. It can handle everything from salads and seafood to richer poultry and pork dishes, and the sweeter versions are excellent with a variety of cheeses and desserts.

Chenin Blanc may not have the immediate recognition of some other white varieties, but it's a star in its own right, always ready to surprise and delight with its performance. It's certainly a grape that deserves its place in the limelight.


7. Torrontés

Torrontés is a grape that, in my years of tasting and wines, has always struck me as a bit of an enigma. It's Argentina's signature white grape variety, and when handled with care, it can yield wines of real character and charm, with a personality quite unlike any other.

In the glass, Torrontés produces a wine that's usually pale gold in color, but it's when you put your nose to the glass that you really start to understand this grape's appeal. The aromatic profile is compelling and unique, with an intoxicating blend of floral notes, reminiscent of roses and geraniums, combined with expressive fruit aromas, think of peach, lychee, and citrus.

On the palate, Torrontés delivers a surprising twist. Despite the sweet floral and fruit aromas, the wine is usually made in a dry style. It often exhibits a full body and moderate acidity, which provides a good balance to the powerful aromatics. The flavor profile mirrors the nose, with a lovely harmony of fruit and floral notes, sometimes with a hint of spice or minerality in the finish.

The key regions for Torrontés production are Salta, La Rioja, and Catamarca. Each brings its own unique terroir influences to the grape, with the high-altitude vineyards of Salta often considered the pinnacle of Torrontés expression.

What I appreciate about Torrontés is its ability to match with a range of dishes that can be challenging for other wines. Its aromatics and body make it a perfect companion to spicy Asian cuisine, bold-flavored seafood, and a variety of hard and soft cheeses.


8. Viognier

Viognier – a grape variety that, when mentioned, brings to mind the image of sun-drenched vineyards of the Rhône Valley in France.

It's a grape that demands a patient and understanding winemaker – one that can respect and cherish its capricious nature, one that can coax out its unique charms.

Viognier wines are immediately recognisable, even in a crowded room of swirling glasses. They carry a deep golden hue, often more pronounced than many other whites, hinting at the rich, luscious flavours that are to come.

A whiff of Viognier is like walking into a blooming summer garden, with a bouquet of floral notes - think honeysuckle, jasmine, and a hint of violet. This is generously overlaid with an opulent blend of apricots, peaches, and preserved citrus, and often a dash of sweet spices, a mesmerising aroma that is undeniably captivating.

On the palate, Viognier tends to be full-bodied, with a lush, almost oily texture that can be quite a surprise to those more familiar with leaner white wines. The high alcohol content of these wines is complemented by low acidity, making for a smooth, rounded mouthfeel.

Viognier's spiritual home is in Condrieu in the Northern Rhône, where it produces richly perfumed, luxurious wines that are considered the benchmark for the variety. However, it has found a new lease of life in the New World, particularly in California and Australia, where innovative winemakers are crafting their own expressions of this fascinating grape.

Viognier's robust flavour profile and full body make it a versatile partner for food. It can stand up to quite rich, flavourful dishes - think creamy curries, lobster thermidor, or a succulent roast chicken.

Viognier is certainly not a grape for the faint-hearted. It's a wine that offers a journey, an adventure into a world of bold aromas and flavours. For those willing to embrace its flamboyant character, a bottle of Viognier offers a delightful and rewarding experience.


9. Trebbiano

Trebbiano, a name that rings familiarity, is a ubiquitous presence in the world of wine. Yet, it is often unnoticed, like a quiet guest at a lively party.

The Trebbiano grape produces wines that are lightly colored, almost as pale as water in the glass. A visual trait that is quite characteristic of this varietal, subtly reminding us that it is not always the loudest that commands attention.

When you lean in for a sniff, the Trebbiano greets you with a soft, unassuming scent. Hints of green apple, lemon, and a whisper of almond might play on your senses. There is an understated elegance to its aroma, a gentle nudge rather than a boisterous shout.

In the mouth, Trebbiano is light-bodied and fresh. The flavors echo its aroma, with green fruits and a touch of citrus. Its modest alcohol and good acidity make it a pleasant, easy-drinking wine, the sort you'd want to sip on a warm afternoon in a sunlit Italian piazza.

Trebbiano's home is Italy, where it is the most planted white grape variety. It thrives in many regions, from Emilia-Romagna to Lazio, from Abruzzo to Umbria. Outside Italy, it's known as Ugni Blanc, where it's extensively grown in France for Cognac production.

Winemaking practices with Trebbiano are traditionally straightforward. Fermentation in stainless steel tanks to preserve its freshness is common. However, in recent years, some producers have been experimenting with skin contact and oak ageing to coax out more complexity and structure.

When it comes to food pairings, Trebbiano is an amiable companion. Its lightness and freshness make it an ideal match for simple seafood dishes, salads, and light pasta dishes.

Trebbiano is a testament to the beauty of simplicity. It may not possess the flamboyance of some other grape varieties, but what it offers is a genuine expression of its terroir and a refreshing, easy-drinking wine that invites you to take a moment, slow down, and enjoy life's simple pleasures.


10. Albariño

Albariño is a name that rolls off the tongue as easily as the wine itself, is a true gem from the north-western coast of Spain, primarily in the Galicia region. Though it has its roots in Spain, Albariño has found a new home in parts of California, Oregon, and even New Zealand.

As you pour Albariño into a glass, it sparkles with a bright, lemon-yellow hue. Sometimes, you can catch a hint of green, reminiscent of the lush vineyards where it grows. It glows under the light, inviting you to come closer, to explore its depths.

When you lean in, Albariño greets you with a bouquet of aromas. Imagine strolling through an orchard in the heart of summer, ripe peaches and apricots hanging heavy on the branches, the air filled with their sweet fragrance. Add to that a hint of citrus zest and a touch of salinity, like a soft sea breeze, and you have Albariño.

On the palate, Albariño is a delightful surprise. It's a study in contrasts, combining rich, ripe stone fruit flavors with a crisp acidity that makes your mouth water. It's medium-bodied, with a slight creaminess that's balanced by its zesty, mineral finish.

Albariño thrives in the cool, coastal climate of Rías Baixas, where the Atlantic Ocean's influence is strongly felt. Winemaking techniques vary, but the focus is always on preserving the grape's vibrant acidity and aromatic profile. Some producers experiment with lees ageing, which can add complexity and a subtle richness to the wine.

Food pairings with Albariño are a joy. Its natural affinity for seafood is well known, making it the perfect companion for a plate of fresh oysters or a traditional Spanish seafood paella. But don't stop there – Albariño is versatile enough to pair well with spicy Asian dishes, creamy pastas, and a variety of cheeses.

Albariño, with its heady aroma, lively palate, and ability to capture the essence of its terroir, is a testament to the beauty of Spanish wine. It's a wine that invites you to experience the warmth of the Spanish sun, the cool Atlantic breeze, and the joy of discovering something truly special.


11. Sémillon

Sémillon is a bit of an unsung hero of the viticultural world, and it's a grape that requires a bit of sleuthing to uncover its true nature. To the casual observer, it may seem like a supporting player, but to the trained eye – or rather palate – it is a star in its own right.

When you first pour a glass of Sémillon, you're greeted with a spectrum of colors that can range from straw to gold, hinting at the journey the grape has taken from vineyard to bottle. The longer it has aged, the deeper the gold, a visual testament to the patience of the winemaker and the rewards that await those who can wait.

Bring the glass to your nose, and the complexity of Sémillon begins to reveal itself. A young Sémillon can be a delicate balance of fresh citrus and green apple, a bright and inviting introduction.

However, with age, the aromas evolve, and you might find yourself greeted by notes of honey, ripe fig, and marzipan. If you're lucky enough to encounter a Botrytis-affected Sémillon, such as a Sauternes, you're in for a truly decadent experience of intense honey, apricot, and marmalade.

The flavors of Sémillon are as varied as its aromas, dependent on age and winemaking techniques. Fresh and crisp in its youth, it develops a rich, waxy texture as it matures. The flavors can range from lime and green apple to richer notes of honey, nougat, and even toasted bread. The beauty of Sémillon is its complexity and its ability to transform over time.

Sémillon calls Bordeaux, France, its original home, where it often blends with Sauvignon Blanc to create both dry and sweet wines. But this adaptable grape has also found a home in Australia's Hunter Valley, where it is crafted into remarkable single-varietal wines.

When considering food pairings, Sémillon's versatility shines. With seafood, its bright acidity and citrus notes are a delight, while its richer, aged versions stand up well to dishes with cream sauces or even foie gras.

For sweet Sémillon, such as Sauternes, blue cheese or dessert dishes like crème brûlée make for an indulgent pairing.


12. Pinot Blanc

With origins likely in Burgundy, France, but now spread widely from Alsace to Italy, Germany, and even the cooler climes of Canada and the United States, Pinot Blanc is the sort of grape that can surprise you with its versatility.

In the glass, Pinot Blanc presents itself with a gentle straw-yellow colour, often with hints of green. It's a wine that doesn't shout, but invites you in with a polite and appealing glint.

The aromatic profile of Pinot Blanc is subtle and refined, with delicate notes of green apple, pear, almond, and often a distinctive flinty or chalky minerality. It doesn't leap out of the glass like some varieties, but rather it entices you in, asking you to take a moment and truly engage with the wine.

On the palate, Pinot Blanc is typically medium-bodied, with a slightly creamy texture that is beautifully balanced by its crisp acidity. The flavours carry through from the nose, with the addition of a lovely long, mineral-driven finish in the best examples.

While Burgundy may be its spiritual home, it's in Alsace, France, where Pinot Blanc truly takes the limelight, creating wonderfully expressive wines that balance fruit, acidity, and minerality. In Italy, particularly in the northern region of Alto Adige, Pinot Bianco (as it's known there) produces charming, vivacious wines, often with a bit more body and texture.

Pinot Blanc wines are often made in stainless steel tanks to preserve their fresh fruit characteristics, but some producers use older oak barrels for fermentation or ageing, which can add a layer of complexity and a slightly richer texture to the wine.

In terms of food pairings, Pinot Blanc is a very versatile partner at the table. Its bright acidity and understated fruit character make it a wonderful match for a range of dishes, from fresh seafood to light poultry dishes, and even mildly spiced Asian cuisine.


13. Glera

Glera, the grape famously known as the heart and soul of Italy's Prosecco, is a master of allure and effervescence, a veritable embodiment of Italy's joie de vivre.

From its humble beginnings in the Veneto and Friuli regions, Glera has charmed its way into flute glasses around the world, sparking joy with its fresh and vivacious character.

In appearance, Glera-based wines are a sight to behold. The wine, often in the form of Prosecco, greets you with a radiant straw-yellow hue, shot through with a lively stream of fine, persistent bubbles. It is the promise of a celebration in every glass, a visual representation of Italian exuberance and flair.

On the nose, Glera is an ode to freshness and simplicity. It offers a delightful bouquet of green apples, pear, honeysuckle, and a touch of citrus zest. It's not the kind of wine that needs to be pondered over, but rather enjoyed for its straightforward and refreshing aromatic profile.

When it comes to the palate, Glera excels in delivering a lively and refreshing experience. Green fruit flavours are at the fore, backed by a bright, zingy acidity that keeps the wine balanced and light. The bubbles add an extra dimension to the experience, making it not just a taste, but a sensation.

Glera thrives in the Veneto and Friuli regions in northeastern Italy, where the cool climate and chalky soils give the grape its signature freshness and zest.

The Charmat method, involving a second fermentation in large steel tanks, is the most common winemaking technique used, which helps preserve the grape's primary fruit aromas and the wine's sparkling character.

Pairing Glera or Prosecco with food is a delightful endeavor. Its high acidity and light body make it a versatile match for a variety of dishes.

It works exceptionally well with appetizers, seafood, and light pasta dishes, but the beauty of Glera is its ability to turn any meal into a celebration.


14. Sercial

The Sercial grape, a distinctive protagonist in the world of fortified wines, hails from the steep and sun-drenched slopes of the island of Madeira.

With a tenacity that mirrors the island's rugged landscape, Sercial continues to carve out a niche for itself as the primary player in the driest and most acidic style of Madeira wine.

Visually, a wine made from Sercial is a stunning deep amber, often developing a richer, burnished hue as it ages. The color itself is a visual journey into the wine's long life, a hint at the remarkable aging potential of Sercial-based Madeiras.

Sercial's aromatic profile presents an intoxicating dichotomy between the freshness of its bright citrus notes and the depth of its nutty, caramel undertones. It's a wine that demands contemplation, drawing you in with a sensory tapestry woven with threads of lemon peel, almond, dried fruit, and just a hint of salinity.

The palate of a Sercial Madeira is where the grape truly flexes its muscles. It delivers a rush of high acidity that cuts through the rich, complex flavors like a knife, balancing out the sweetness and creating a wine that is surprisingly dry. The finish is exceptionally long, a testament to Sercial's fortitude and resilience.

Sercial thrives in the highest vineyards of Madeira, where the cool temperatures and plentiful sunshine create the perfect conditions for the grape to develop its high acidity. The winemaking process involves a unique method known as 'estufagem', where the wine is heated and deliberately oxidized, creating a wine that is virtually indestructible.

In terms of food pairings, the high acidity and complex flavor profile of Sercial Madeira make it a versatile partner for a variety of dishes. It works particularly well with salty appetizers, strong cheeses, and nuts, but it is also exceptional as a standalone aperitif.


15. Pedro Giménez

Pedro Giménez – not to be confused with Spain's Pedro Ximénez, the darling of the sherry world – is the most widely planted white grape variety in Argentina.

In its youth, a Pedro Giménez wine exhibits a light straw-yellow colour, often with greenish highlights, that may deepen to a more golden hue with age. While it's not a wine you'd generally choose to lay down in the cellar, it is capable of some development.

When coaxed by a skilled winemaker, Pedro Giménez can reveal an engaging aromatic profile that balances floral notes with a hint of green apple and a touch of tropical fruit.

It may not have the heady perfume of a Riesling or the complexity of a Chardonnay, but there's an honesty and simplicity to Pedro Giménez that is part of its charm.

On the palate, expect a wine that is medium-bodied and often relatively high in acidity, with flavours that reflect the nose. The best examples have a certain liveliness that makes them very appealing, especially when served chilled on a warm day.

While Pedro Giménez can be found across Argentina, it is particularly at home in the high-altitude vineyards of the Mendoza region. Here, the cool nights help to preserve the grape's natural acidity, while the intense sunshine of the days allows it to ripen fully.

The production of Pedro Giménez is usually quite straightforward, with fermentation in stainless steel being the norm. Some winemakers choose to use older oak barrels for fermentation and/or ageing to add a bit of complexity, but this is the exception rather than the rule.

Food pairing? Pedro Giménez is a wine that doesn't demand the spotlight, making it a great choice for simple, light dishes. It pairs beautifully with fresh seafood, grilled chicken, or a summer salad.


16. Müller-Thurgau

Müller-Thurgau, the love child of Riesling and Madeleine Royale, is a grape with a chequered reputation. Not as regal as its parent Riesling, nor as nuanced, it nevertheless charms with its own brand of straightforward appeal.

Müller-Thurgau's wines generally show a clear, pale straw hue, lacking the deep golden tones of more voluptuous varieties. It's not a grape that's meant for long cellaring – the joy of Müller-Thurgau is in its youthful freshness.

The grape's aromatic profile won't hold you spellbound with complexity, but its frank and appealing scents are part of its charm. Think of the perfumed essence of apple blossoms, a soft whisper of freshly cut grass, and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

Flavours, too, are forthright rather than intricate. Bright apple and pear often lead the charge, with a subtle musky spiciness rounding out the palate. But don't dismiss Müller-Thurgau as one-dimensional; the best examples balance their fruity sweetness with a lively acidity that can be quite invigorating.

The variety's heartland is Germany, where it was once the most widely planted grape. Today, it still plays a significant role, particularly in the cooler regions such as Mosel and Rheinhessen. It's also found a happy home in northern Italy's Alto Adige and Trentino regions, as well as pockets of New Zealand, where it's enjoyed a bit of a renaissance.

Winemaking techniques for Müller-Thurgau are generally focused on preserving the grape's natural freshness and aromatic profile. Stainless steel is the vessel of choice for fermentation and ageing, although a small number of producers experiment with barrel fermentation or ageing for added complexity.

As for food pairings, Müller-Thurgau's sprightly character makes it a delightful partner to light dishes. Think of a fresh green salad dressed with a tangy vinaigrette, delicate white fish, or a platter of mild cheeses. Its gentle sweetness can also make it a good match for slightly spicy Asian cuisine.


17. Muscat/Moscato

Muscat – or Moscato, as it's fondly known in Italy – is one of those grape varieties that sparkles with personality, charm and exuberance. It's a grape that seems to have an innate sense of joy about it, one that it passes on to anyone lucky enough to have a glass of its wine in their hand.

When you pour a Muscat, you're met with hues that range from a light, almost ethereal straw colour, to a deep and rich gold. In some cases, you'll find delightful pink or even red Muscats, adding a playful touch to the already charismatic grape.

One whiff of a Muscat, and you're met with an unmistakable bouquet. This is a grape that makes its presence known, a veritable explosion of aromas that can range from fresh grapes and roses to more tropical and exotic notes like lychee and pineapple. One of Muscat's most endearing qualities is how the scent of the grape translates so directly into the wine, a faithful reflection of its source.

On the palate, Muscat wines are often sweet, but always balanced by a zesty acidity. The flavours echo the nose, with fresh and dried fruits, floral notes, and often a hint of spice. The sweetness of Muscat is never cloying but rather a refreshing, fruit-driven sweetness that dances on the palate.

Muscat is a truly global traveller, with notable regions spanning across France, Italy, Spain, Australia, and the USA. Each region imparts its own touch to the Muscat grape, but all share a common thread of that unmissable, expressive character.

In terms of winemaking techniques, Muscat is versatile. You'll find it in still wines, sparkling wines, and even fortified wines. One of the most famous examples of a fortified Muscat wine is the luscious Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise from France.

Food pairing with Muscat depends on the style of wine. Lighter, drier styles pair beautifully with fresh fruits, salads, and light seafood dishes. The sweeter styles, including the sparkling Moscato d'Asti, are a delight with desserts, particularly those featuring fresh fruit. And the rich, fortified Muscats? They're a cheese board's best friend.


Characteristics of White Wine Grapes

White wine grapes are known for their diverse range of flavors and aromas, making them a popular choice for wine drinkers around the world. 

Understanding the characteristics of white wine grapes is essential to selecting the perfect bottle for any occasion.


1. Flavor Profiles

White wine grapes offer a wide range of flavor profiles, from fruity and floral to herbal and mineral.

For example, Chardonnay is known for its buttery and oaky flavors, while Sauvignon Blanc offers a more herbaceous and grassy profile.

Riesling, on the other hand, is often associated with fruity notes of peach and apricot.


2. Aromas

White wine grapes also offer a diverse range of aromas, from citrus and tropical fruits to stone fruits and floral notes.

Gewürztraminer is known for its floral and spicy aromas, while Viognier offers a more tropical and fruity bouquet.


3. Acidity Levels

Acidity is an essential characteristic of white wine grapes, providing a crisp and refreshing taste.

White wine grapes can have high, medium, or low acidity levels, depending on the varietal and growing conditions.

Riesling, for example, is known for its high acidity, while Chardonnay often offers a more medium acidity level.


4. Sugar Levels

Sugar levels in white wine grapes can vary from dry to off-dry to sweet. Dry white wines have little to no residual sugar, while off-dry wines have a slight sweetness.

Sweet white wines, such as Muscat and Late Harvest Riesling, have a higher sugar content. Chenin Blanc can range from dry to sweet, depending on the winemaking process.


5. Tannins

Tannins are responsible for the astringent and bitter taste found in red wines, but are not typically found in white wines.

The tannin in red wine comes from the grape skins which remain part of the ‘wine’ throughout the fermentation process.

However, with white wines, the grape skins (and seeds and stalks) are removed immediately. This means tannins have little time to become part of the wine and tannin is a component of white wine that is rarely noticeable.


6. Aging Potential

White wine grapes can have both short-term and long-term aging potential, depending on the varietal and winemaking process

Chardonnay, for example, can be aged in oak barrels to develop a more complex and nuanced flavor profile.

Riesling, on the other hand, is often consumed young to preserve its fresh and fruity characteristics.


Growing White Wine Grapes

White wine grapes are found across the world, with unique climate and soil characteristics imparting regional imprints onto the wines made.

The quality of white wine grapes depends on the growing conditions, which include factors like the climate, soil, vineyard management techniques, and the harvesting methods.

Let's take a closer look at what all of this means.


Climate Requirements

White wine grapes require a cool to moderate climate for optimal growth. The ideal temperature range for growing white wine grapes is between 70°F and 90°F.

A cooler climate helps to preserve the acidity and aromas of the grapes, which are essential for producing high-quality white wines.

In contrast, warmer climates can result in overripe grapes with lower acidity levels, leading to flabby and unbalanced wines.

Therefore, white wine grapes are typically grown in cooler regions, such as France's Loire Valley, Germany's Mosel region, and New Zealand's Marlborough region.


Soil Requirements

White wine grapes require well-drained, nutrient-rich soil for optimal growth. The soil's nutrient content affects the grape's flavor, aroma, and acidity levels.

For example, soils rich in limestone, such as those found in France's Burgundy region, produce Chardonnay grapes with a distinct mineral flavor.

In contrast, soils rich in volcanic ash, such as those found in Italy's Sicily region, produce grapes with a unique smoky flavor.

Therefore, the soil type and nutrient content play a crucial role in determining the grape's flavor profile.


Vineyard Management Techniques

Vineyard management techniques are essential for ensuring the health and productivity of white wine grape vines.

Techniques such as trellising, pruning, and canopy management help to control the vine's growth, increase sunlight exposure, and improve air circulation.

Trellising involves training the vines to grow along a support system, such as wires or stakes, to ensure proper vine growth and fruit development.

Pruning involves cutting back the vines to control the yield and quality of the grapes.

Canopy management involves removing leaves and shoots to improve sunlight exposure and air circulation, which helps to prevent disease and improve grape quality.


Harvesting Methods

White wine grapes can be harvested using either hand-picking or machine harvesting methods.

Hand-picking involves manually harvesting the grapes, which is labor-intensive but allows for selective picking of only the ripest grapes.

Machine harvesting involves using a machine to shake the grapevines, causing the grapes to fall onto a conveyor belt for sorting.

Machine harvesting is more efficient and cost-effective than hand-picking but can result in lower grape quality due to the inclusion of unripe or damaged grapes.

Therefore, the choice of harvesting method depends on the grape variety, vineyard size, and desired grape quality.


Famous White Wine Grape Regions

Some regions are particularly renowned for producing exceptional white wines. Each region has its own unique climate, soil, and winemaking traditions that contribute to the flavor and character of the wines produced there.

Here are some of the top white wine grape regions and the characteristics that make them stand out:

France

  • Loire Valley: Known for producing crisp, refreshing Sauvignon Blanc and Chenin Blanc wines with notes of citrus and minerality.
  • Burgundy: Famous for its Chardonnay wines, which are rich and complex with flavors of apple, pear, and vanilla.
  • Alsace: Known for its dry Riesling wines, which are floral and aromatic with notes of peach and apricot.
  • Bordeaux: While Bordeaux is primarily known for its red wines, it also produces some excellent white wines made from Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon grapes. These wines are often blended and have a complex flavor profile with notes of citrus, honey, and oak.


Italy

  • Veneto: Known for its Prosecco sparkling wine made from Glera grapes, which are light and refreshing with notes of apple and pear.
  • Piedmont: Famous for its Gavi wines made from the Cortese grape, which are crisp and floral with notes of lemon and almond.
  • Tuscany: Known for its Vernaccia di San Gimignano wines, which are dry and minerally with notes of citrus and white flowers.
  • Sicily: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Grillo grape, which are full-bodied and aromatic with notes of tropical fruit and honey.


Spain

  • Rioja: Known for its white wines made from Viura grapes, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of green apple and pear.
  • Rias Baixas: Famous for its Albariño wines, which are light and floral with notes of peach and apricot.
  • Penedes: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Xarel-lo grape, which are rich and complex with notes of citrus and honey.
  • La Mancha: Known for its Airen grape, which is used to produce light and refreshing white wines with notes of apple and pear.


Germany

  • Mosel: Famous for its Riesling wines, which are light and floral with notes of peach and apricot.
  • Rheingau: Known for its dry Riesling wines, which are crisp and minerally with notes of citrus and green apple.
  • Pfalz: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Gewürztraminer grape, which are full-bodied and aromatic with notes of lychee and rose
  • Nahe: Known for its dry Riesling wines, which are floral and aromatic with notes of peach and apricot.


United States

  • California: Known for its Chardonnay wines, which are rich and buttery with notes of vanilla and oak.
  • Oregon: Famous for its Pinot Gris wines, which are light and refreshing with notes of citrus and pear.
  • Washington: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Riesling grape, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of green apple and lemon.
  • New York: Known for its Riesling wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of peach and apricot.


Australia

  • South Australia: Famous for its Chardonnay wines, which are rich and full-bodied with notes of tropical fruit and oak.
  • Victoria: Known for its Sauvignon Blanc wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of citrus and grass.
  • New South Wales: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Semillon grape, which are light and refreshing with notes of lemon and grapefruit.
  • Western Australia: Known for its Chardonnay wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of apple and pear.


New Zealand

  • Marlborough: Famous for its Sauvignon Blanc wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of grapefruit and passionfruit.
  • Hawke's Bay: Known for its Chardonnay wines, which are rich and full-bodied with notes of tropical fruit and oak.
  • Gisborne: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Chardonnay grape, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of apple and lemon.
  • Central Otago: Known for its Pinot Gris wines, which are light and refreshing with notes of pear and honey.


South Africa

  • Stellenbosch: Famous for its Chenin Blanc wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of green apple and pear.
  • Paarl: Known for its Chardonnay wines, which are rich and full-bodied with notes of tropical fruit and oak.
  • Franschhoek: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Sauvignon Blanc grape, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of citrus and grass.
  • Elgin: Known for its Chardonnay wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of apple and lemon.


South America

  • Chile: Famous for its Sauvignon Blanc wines, which are crisp and refreshing with notes of citrus and grass.
  • Argentina: Known for its Torrontes wines, which are floral and aromatic with notes of peach and apricot.
  • Uruguay: Produces some excellent white wines made from the Albariño grape, which are light and refreshing with notes of peach and apricot.


White Wine Grape Varietals and Blends

White wine grape varietals and blends are the backbone of the white wine industry. The varietals and blends offer a diverse range of flavors, aromas, and textures that cater to different palates and preferences.

In this section, we will explore the different white wine grape varietals and blends, their characteristics, and food pairings.


Single Varietal Wines

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is the most popular white wine grape varietal in the world. It originated in the Burgundy region of France and is now grown in many wine regions across the globe. Chardonnay has a rich, buttery flavor with notes of vanilla, oak, and tropical fruit. It pairs well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc originated in the Bordeaux region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a crisp, acidic flavor with notes of citrus, green apple, and grass. Sauvignon Blanc pairs well with seafood, salads, and light pasta dishes.


Riesling

Riesling originated in Germany and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a sweet, floral flavor with notes of honey, peach, and apricot. Riesling pairs well with spicy foods, Asian cuisine, and fruit-based desserts.


Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris

Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris originated in the Alsace region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a light, crisp flavor with notes of apple, pear, and citrus. Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris pairs well with seafood, light pasta dishes, and salads.


Chenin Blanc

Chenin Blanc originated in the Loire Valley region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a crisp, acidic flavor with notes of green apple, honey, and floral aromas. Chenin Blanc pairs well with spicy foods, seafood, and light pasta dishes.


Gewürztraminer

Gewürztraminer originated in the Alsace region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a sweet, floral flavor with notes of lychee, rose, and spice. Gewürztraminer pairs well with spicy foods, Asian cuisine, and fruit-based desserts.


Viognier

Viognier originated in the Rhône Valley region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a rich, full-bodied flavor with notes of apricot, peach, and floral aromas. Viognier pairs well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Albariño

Albariño originated in the Rias Baixas region of Spain and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a crisp, acidic flavor with notes of citrus, green apple, and mineral aromas. Albariño pairs well with seafood, salads, and light pasta dishes.


Muscat/Moscato

Muscat/Moscato originated in the Mediterranean region and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a sweet, floral flavor with notes of peach, apricot, and honey. Muscat/Moscato pairs well with fruit-based desserts and spicy foods.


Semillon

Semillon originated in the Bordeaux region of France and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a rich, full-bodied flavor with notes of honey, vanilla, and oak. Semillon pairs well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Trebbiano

Trebbiano originated in Italy and is now grown in many wine regions worldwide. It has a light, crisp flavor with notes of apple, pear, and citrus. Trebbiano pairs well with seafood, light pasta dishes, and salads.


Blended Wines

Bordeaux-style blends

Bordeaux-style blends are a combination of two or more white wine grape varietals, typically Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon.

These blends have a rich, full-bodied flavor with notes of honey, vanilla, and oak. Bordeaux-style blends pair well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Rhône-style blends

Rhône-style blends are a combination of two or more white wine grape varietals, typically Viognier, Roussanne, and Marsanne.

These blends have a rich, full-bodied flavor with notes of apricot, peach, and floral aromas. Rhône-style blends pair well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Popular White Wine Blends

Chardonnay-Sauvignon Blanc

Chardonnay-Sauvignon Blanc blends have a crisp, acidic flavor with notes of citrus, green apple, and tropical fruit. These blends pair well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


Semillon-Sauvignon Blanc

Semillon-Sauvignon Blanc blends have a rich, full-bodied flavor with notes of honey, vanilla, and oak. These blends pair well with seafood, poultry, and creamy sauces.


White Wine Grape Pairings

Pairing white wine with food is an art form that can enhance the flavors of both the wine and the dish.

White wine grapes offer a wide range of flavor profiles, acidity levels, and sugar levels that make them versatile for food pairings.

Here are some recommendations for pairing white wine grapes with different types of food:

  • Seafood: White wine is a classic pairing with seafood. The acidity and fruitiness of white wine grapes complement the delicate flavors of seafood. For lighter seafood dishes like oysters or shrimp, try pairing with a crisp Sauvignon Blanc or a dry Riesling. For richer seafood dishes like lobster or scallops, a buttery Chardonnay or a Viognier can complement the flavors.
  • Poultry: White wine grapes can also pair well with poultry dishes. For roasted chicken or turkey, try pairing with a medium-bodied Chardonnay or a Pinot Grigio. For spicier chicken dishes like chicken curry, a Gewürztraminer or a Riesling with a touch of sweetness can balance out the heat.
  • Pasta: White wine grapes can also be paired with pasta dishes. For lighter pasta dishes like linguine with clams, try pairing with a crisp Sauvignon Blanc or a Pinot Grigio. For creamier pasta dishes like fettuccine Alfredo, a buttery Chardonnay can complement the richness.
  • Cheese: White wine grapes can be paired with a variety of cheeses. For soft cheeses like goat cheese or brie, try pairing with a crisp Sauvignon Blanc or a dry Riesling. For harder cheeses like cheddar or gouda, a buttery Chardonnay or a Semillon can complement the flavors.
  • Desserts: White wine grapes can also be paired with desserts. For fruit-based desserts like fruit tarts or sorbets, try pairing with a sweet Riesling or a Muscat. For richer desserts like cheesecake or crème brûlée, a sweet Gewürztraminer or a late-harvest Semillon can complement the flavors.

It is important to note that personal taste preferences can vary, and experimentation is encouraged to find the perfect pairing.

Additionally, the region and vintage of the wine can also affect the pairing. It is recommended to consult with a sommelier or wine expert for specific recommendations based on the wine being served.


Still thirsty for knowledge on white wine? Don't miss our massive guide to the different types of white wine.

Read More Posts Like This:

November 28, 2023

Kung Fu Girl Riesling Review If you’re a fan of sweet wines, you might be .....

2021 Kung Fu Girl Riesling Review | Tasted & Rated

November 2, 2023

London Wine Competition 2024: Early Bird Entry Open Now!The judges hard at work at LWC .....

London Wine Competition 2024: Early Bird Entry Open Now!

October 31, 2023

How Sweden is Reinventing the Wine Map [Swedish Wine]Sweden isn’t usually the answer on the .....

How Sweden is Reinventing the Wine Map [Swedish Wine]

October 29, 2023

Kirkland K-Vine Chardonnay Review [Costco Wine] The 2020 Kirkland K-Vine Chardonnay is a single vineyard .....

Kirkland K-Vine Chardonnay Review [Costco Wine]

October 26, 2023

Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2022 Review [Tasted & Rated]Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand gets .....

Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2022 Review [Tasted & Rated]

October 22, 2023

2022 Matua Sauvignon Blanc Wine Review | Marlborough Magic?I’ve reviewed quite a few Sauvignon Blancs .....

2022 Matua Sauvignon Blanc Wine Review | Marlborough Magic?

October 19, 2023

Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc 2021 Review [Tasted & Rated]I'll confess with you straight away...I have .....

Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc 2021 Review [Tasted & Rated]

August 6, 2023

How to Store Open Champagne [5 Rules to Save Champagne] Champagne doesn't really keep well .....

How to Store Open Champagne [5 Rules to Save Champagne]


About the Author Tim Edison


Tim started Wine Turtle way back in 2015.
These days he contributes to Wine Turtle (and other renowned wine publications) while continuing his wine education.
Tim's wine of the month is the Coates & Seely Reserve Brut NV (from Hampshire, England).



Leave a Reply


Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}